Bagworth, United Kingdom: RAIB makes five recommendations

29 Jul

LXinfoImage216-RAIBlogo-RAIBThe Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB) has published its report into an incident on Lindridge Farm user worked crossing, near Bagworth, Leicestershire at about 07.38 on March 22nd 2012. The RAIB has made five recommendations and communicated a further learning point.

A motorist used the telephone at the level crossing to ask the signaller at Network Rail’s East Midlands Control Centre for authorisation to cross the railway. The signaller checked the indications on his workstation, observed that a train had already passed over the crossing, and gave permission to cross. The motorist opened the near gate, crossed the railway line on foot, and while opening the far gate saw a train approaching. The motorist called the signaller back to report what had happened.

The immediate cause of the incident was that the signaller believed the train had already passed the level crossing when he gave the motorist permission to cross because his workstation view showed the level crossing in the wrong place. This error had been present on the workstation view from the time it was commissioned on 3 January 2012 as part of a project to transfer control of the railway from Leicester signal box to the East Midlands Control Centre (EMCC).

This project had redrawn a signalling plan for the Leicester area and introduced an error; a track circuit was incorrectly named. This error was not noticed and was copied into a scheme plan, which was subsequently used to check the design of the signaller’s workstation views. During these design checks, the level crossing was moved to the wrong track section on the view, so that it corresponded with the error on the scheme plan. The error on the view was not identified during testing so the
signaller’s workstation was commissioned with the level crossing shown in the wrong place.

The RAIB also observes: the signaller did not report the incident straight away; the workstation had been commissioned with two other user worked crossings shown in the wrong place; and the other two level crossings had also previously been shown in the wrong place on the signaller’s panel at Leicester signal box prior to the transfer of control to the EMCC.

The RAIB has made five recommendations, all directed at Network Rail. These cover the management of signalling source records needed for a re-control project, ways of reducing the likelihood of errors on signalling or scheme plans, correlating new signalling displays to the existing display, improving the management of deferred test logs, and better controls for installing telephones at level crossings. The RAIB also identified a learning point for the railway industry, about the importance of immediately reporting allegations of incidents that are received from members of the public.

2 Responses to “Bagworth, United Kingdom: RAIB makes five recommendations”

  1. Andrew Fraser July 29, 2013 at 13:47 #

    Good to see RAIB encouraging the immediate reporting allegations of incidents that are received from members of the public – this should be encouraged in the road environment as well. (It doesn’t appear to be.) The next step, of course, is to encourage appropriate action on the allegations …

  2. Vicky Allen, Leics & Rutland Bridleways Assn July 29, 2013 at 19:49 #

    A quick look at the relevant OS map reveals that the Lindridge Farm crossing is not in the parish of Bagworth but further S, below the village of Thornton, in the parish of Desford. It would be more accurately described as Botcheston – the nearest village. If the relevant staff can’t understand and check a map it’s no wonder a few crossings wander off – presumably in disgust.

    I just hope they don’t use the post codes for location purposes. This would move many crossings into the next county.

    Quite disgraceful that the basic data is not checked, double-checked and re-checked.

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