United Kingdom: Annual review shows level crossing accident risk reducing in Great Britain

16 May

Professor Andrew Evans has updated his annual analysis of fatal train accidents on running lines of the national railway system of Great Britain to the end of 2012, based on fatal accident data over the 46-year period 1967 to 2012.

There were no fatal train collisions, derailments or overruns in 2012 for the fifth consecutive calendar year. That continuing good performance contributes to a further reduction in the estimated mean frequency of such accidents from 0.38 per year in 2011 to 0.34 in 2012 .The estimated mean number of fatalities per year in such accidents fell from 1.50 in 2011 to 1.36 in 2012.

On the other hand, there were three accidental fatal collisions between trains and road vehicles in 2012, each with one fatality. That performance leads to an estimated frequency of 2.27 such accidents per year in 2012, compared with 2.29 in 2011, with 3.18 fatalities per year in 2012 compared with 3.21 in 2011.

The long-term rate of reduction in the accident rate per train-kilometre is estimated to be 6.8% per year for train collisions, derailments and overruns, and 3.4% per year for collisions between trains and road motor vehicles.

Professor Evans’ paper examines the evolution of the estimates since 2001, and makes comparisons with results of the Safety Risk Model (SRM) of the Rail Safety and Standards Board. Both sources estimate long term reductions in mean fatalities per year in train collisions, derailments and overruns, but the SRM has consistently estimated somewhat more fatalities per year than the work of Professor Evans.

To ead the paper in full go to:

https://workspace.imperial.ac.uk/cts/Public/Docs/FTAB2012.pdf

Professor Evans has also updated his analysis of fatal train accidents in the European Economic Area. This can be found at: https://workspace.imperial.ac.uk/cts/Public/Docs/FTAE2012.pdf

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